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Discovered … Member of the African Choir, London Stereoscopic Company, 1891. Photograph: Courtesy of © Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Hidden Beauty: Portraits Not Seen for Over 120 Years

Discovered … Member of the African Choir, London Stereoscopic Company, 1891. Photograph: Courtesy of © Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Discovered … Member of the African Choir, London Stereoscopic Company, 1891. Photograph: Courtesy of © Hulton Archive/Getty Images

These long-lost series of photographs, unseen for 120 years, is the dramatic centrepiece of an illuminating new exhibition called Black Chronicles II.  “The portraits were last shown in the London Illustrated News in 1891,” says Renée Mussai, who has co-curated the show at London’s Rivington Place alongside Mark Sealy MBE, director of Autograph ABP, a foundation that focuses on Black cultural identity often through the use of overlooked archives. “The Hulton Archive, where they came from, did not even know they existed until we uncovered them while excavating their archive as part of our research project.”

“There is a certain melancholy to many of these images, particularly the portraits of children, that speaks of exile and estrangement…  The history of colonialism, in all its contradictions, is present in these portraits,” says Mussai.

 Sara Forbes Bonetta. Brighton, 1862. Photograph: Courtesy of Paul Frecker collection/The Library of Nineteenth-Century Photography

Sara Forbes Bonetta was captured age five by slave raiders in West Africa, rescued by Captain Frederick E Forbes, then presented as a ‘gift’ to Queen Victoria. Photograph: Courtesy of Paul Frecker collection/The Library of Nineteenth-Century Photography.

Drawing on the metaphor of the chronicle the exhibition presents over 200 photographs, the majority of which have never been exhibited or published before. As a curated body of work, these photographs present new knowledge and offer different ways of seeing the Black subject in Victorian Britain, and contribute to an ongoing process of redressing persistent ‘absence’ within the historical record.

Black Chronicles II is a public showcase of Autograph ABP’s commitment to continuous critical enquiry into archive images which have been overlooked, under-researched or simply not recognised as significant previously, but which are highly relevant to black representational politics and cultural history today.

Black Chronicles II is at Rivington Place, London, until 29 November 2014.

 Eleanor Xiniwe of the African Choir, 1891. Photograph: Hulton Archive/Getty Images


Eleanor Xiniwe of the African Choir, 1891.
Photograph: Hulton Archive/Getty Images

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More African Americans Moving to Ghana According to Report

Americans in Ghana

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Africa evokes images of vibrancy and growth instead of poverty, war and struggle, Ezinne Ukoha reports in a story in The Grio.

In this context, Ghana is fast becoming a mecca for Black Americans who are looking for lucrative opportunities in a new environment. About 10,000 African Americans visit Ghana yearly, according to recent reports. Almost 3,000 African Americans live in the capital, Accra, the major hub of Ghana.

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Unleashing the Power of Girls

Unleashing-the-Power-of-Girls_medium

 “Without education my life will be something else.”
Enerstrida Mirriam Michelo, a young survivor of child, early and forced marriage

In 2003, when Mirriam was just nine years old, her parents began to look for a man to marry her to. Mirriam was informed that soon she would have new relatives, and one day, upon her return from school she came home to find a man in her family house. This man – her future husband – was widowed and had three children. When Mirriam was told that she was to marry this man, she refused saying that all she wanted was to stay in school. Mirriam kept refusing and the man kept returning.

Her parents, firm believers that girls should be married at a young age, grew increasingly frustrated with her refusal to marry. At thirteen Mirriam was taken out of school and forced to learn about household chores and how to keep a home. She kept on refusing marriage and her family’s frustration and anger increased and they began beating her, but Mirriam’s will remained unbroken.

With the support of her brother and a teacher, Mirriam’s case was reported to the local YWCA. The YWCA found Mirriam a few days before she was due to be married, and together with a police officer they took Mirriam with them.

Today Mirriam is a 22 year-old young woman from Zambia, a human rights activist, a member of the YWCA of Zambia and she is studying to be a nurse.  Read more about girls and forced marriages…

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Sisterhood Agenda Timeline (1994-2014): Celebrating 20 Years of Sisterhood!

Sisterhood Agenda LogoCHECK OUR ARCHIVES FOR HISTORICAL PRINT MEDIA

1994
-Founded by Angela D. Coleman, Sisterhood Agenda was incorporated in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA.
-The mission of Sisterhood Agenda is to uplift and aid in the self-development of women and girls of African descent, a unique population with special needs.
– Sisterhood Agenda opened its first office on Academy Road in Durham North Carolina.  It was a sub-lease for $395 per month.

AJTW in SA first office

1995
-Sisterhood Agenda launched its first A Journey Toward Womanhood program to prevent teen pregnancy, HIV/AIDS, juvenile delinquency, and school dropout.  -The organization received its first donation from the parent of a program participant and graduates its first group of 18 A Journey Toward Womanhood program participants.
-Its first grant from the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation was received the same year.
-Sisterhood Agenda standardized the A Journey Toward Womanhood curriculum, creating its first program guide and evaluation instruments.
-Teacher/Mentors were hired and trained.
-Sisterhood Agenda held its first women’s empowerment workshop:  Black Women in a New Age of Consciousness.
-Founding President, Angela D. Coleman, began making presentations throughout the city encouraging community leaders and educators to empower women and girls of African descent.
-Sisterhood Agenda gains local recognition and support from media (see Archives and YouTube Channel).

First A Journey Toward Womanhood AJTW

1996
-Sisterhood Agenda began monthly meetings of Sisters in Action, the group of A Journey Toward Womanhood graduates who continued to meet, grow and bond in the spirit of sisterhood.
-Sisterhood Agenda received several more grant awards such as those from the Triangle Community Foundation, UPS Foundation, county, state and city funding.

Sisterhood Agenda Field Trip

1997
-Sisterhood Agenda won its first award, the Nonprofit Sector Stewards Award from the North Carolina Center for Nonprofits for honoring exemplary stewardship for the public trust.
-Due to growth and demand for its services, Sisterhood Agenda relocated to a new, larger office on Chapel Hill Blvd. in Durham, North Carolina.  The office was next to the IRS office and it was a private, special space with two rooms for program activities, one room for administration and a large closet.
-Founding President, Angela D. Coleman, began making presentations throughout the state of North Carolina encouraging community leaders and educators to empower women and girls of African descent.

AJTW Ceremony Group Pic

1998
-Sisterhood Agenda purchased its building, a house zone office/commercial on Chapel Hill Road in Durham, North Carolina.   The organization began and completed renovations to the building that included a large learning center and library.
-Sisterhood Agenda launched its first SisterCamp Summer Enrichment program in the newly established learning center.
-Sisterhood Agenda created Sisterhood Agenda Enterprises, LLC, a for-profit entity designed to generate commercial revenue streams to support the mission of uplifting and aiding in the self-development of women and girls of African descent.  Products for sale included t-shirts, journals, curriculum materials, and books.
-The first time Sisterhood Agenda appeared in ESSENCE magazine was in September 1998 (see Archives).
-Sisterhood Agenda publishes its Sisterhood Journal with Adinkra symbols and affirmations.
-Sisterhood Agenda published its A Journey Toward Womanhood curriculum and student guide for national replication.
-Founding president, Angela D. Coleman, began making presentations throughout the country encouraging community leaders and educators to empower women and girls of African descent.
-Sisterhood Agenda gains national recognition and support from media (see Archives and YouTube Channel).

SA New office lobby

1999
-Sisterhood Agenda began its Office on Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention (OAPP) project, implementing A Journey Toward Womanhood throughout the tri-country area in Durham, Wake, and Orange counties in North Carolina during the next three years.
-Sisterhood Agenda begins giving $3,000 in college scholarships for selected Young Sister on the Rise applicants.
-Sisterhood Agenda purchased its first 15-passenger van.
-Sisterhood Agenda expands SisterCamp serving twice as many girls and lowering its minimum age of participation to 4 years old to empower younger generations.

Sisterhood Agenda Girls

2000
-Sisterhood Agenda and its technology survived the 2K scare.
-The annual Sisterhood Agenda clothing giveaway began this year.
-Sisterhood Agenda began its Office on Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Project (OJJDP) funded by the state of North Carolina.
-A Journey Toward Womanhood:  Effects of an Afrocentric Approach to Pregnancy Prevention Among African American Adolescent Females was published in the scholarly, peer-reviewed journal, Adolescence, Fall 2000, Vol. 35 No. 139.
-Sisterhood Agenda gave $3,000 in college scholarships for selected Young Sister on the Rise applicants.
-Angela D. Coleman, Sisterhood Agenda’s founding president, is recognized among the
2,000 Outstanding Women of the 20th Century.
-Angela is also the recipient of the Today’s Black Woman Community Award.
-In addition, Angela is awarded the Strike Merchants Association Community Award this year.
-Sisterhood Agenda continues SisterCamp implementation.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/MdzNeNpIZ40]

2001
-Sisterhood Agenda’s OAPP project ended.
-Sisterhood Agenda began its Office on Minority Health (OMH) prevention project, forming the Sisterhood Health Coalition.  The project was implemented during the next three years.
-Sisterhood Agenda began national replication of its A Journey Toward Womanhood program and sisterhood expansion.  Programming is now being implemented in over 20 states in the U.S.
-Sisterhood Agenda opened satellite offices in Raleigh, North Carolina and North Brunswick, New Jersey to serve local needs.
-Sisterhood Agenda gave $3,000 in college scholarships for selected Young Sister on the Rise applicants.
-Recognized for the innovative use of technology in programming and increasing public awareness around the issues facing women and girls of African descent, Angela D. Coleman is given the Women Under 30 Technology Award.
-Sisterhood Agenda wins the Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Coalition of North Carolina Award for its outstanding pregnancy prevention strategy.
-Sisterhood Agenda continues SisterCamp implementation.

Ashley Jeys Daughter Ayana

2002
-Sisterhood Agenda expands the number of girls graduating from A Journey Toward Womanhood.
-The annual Sisterhood Agenda clothing giveaway is held this year.
-Sisterhood Agenda gave $3,000 in college scholarships for selected Young Sister on the Rise applicants.
-Sisterhood Agenda continues SisterCamp implementation.
-The Women’s Forum of North Carolina Young Adult Leadership Award was given to Angela D. Coleman, Sisterhood Agenda’s founding president.
-The same year, Angela D. Coleman was elected to Ashoka as a social entrepreneur fellow and recognized internationally for her sisterhood activities.  Angela became the first African American female Ashoka Fellow.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/zKuATBoCMzU]

2003
-Sisterhood Agenda launched its first SHE:  Sisters Healthy & Empowered program to address health issues among women and girls of African descent.
-Sisterhood Agenda receives funding from the Kate B. Reynolds Foundation for SHE implementation in Durham, North Carolina.
-Sisterhood Agenda gave $3,000 in college scholarships for selected Young Sister on the Rise applicants.
-Sisterhood Agenda continues SisterCamp implementation.
-Angela D. Coleman receives the Business and Professional Women “Opening Doors” Award from the North Carolina Women in Business Association.
-The board of Sisterhood Agenda creates a strategic plan for the next 5 years.

Sisterhood Agenda YSOR

2004
-Sisterhood Agenda continued local implementation of A Journey Toward Womanhood, Sisters in Action, Young Sisters on the Rise, SisterCamp, and SHE in Durham, North Carolina. -Sisterhood Agenda’s OMH project ended.
-Sisterhood Agenda gave $3,000 in college scholarships for selected Young Sister on the Rise applicants.
-Sisterhood Agenda Founding President Angela D. Coleman was awarded The
Jefferson Award for Public Service from the American Institute of Public Service.
-Angela was also awarded the Phoenix Rising Award during this year.
-Sisterhood Agenda gains international recognition and support from media (see Archives and YouTube Channel).

a-10 a-11 essence a-22-1  a-13 a-20-1

2005
-Sisterhood Agenda relocated its headquarters to Newark, New Jersey to being its international media campaign and global expansion through global partnerships instead of satellite offices.
-Sisterhood Agenda formed its Executive Advisory Board comprised of influential members of the community.
-Sisterhood Agenda gave $3,000 in college scholarships for selected Young Sister on the Rise applicants.

-The National Association of Black Female Executives in Music and Entertainment (NABFEME) awarded founding president Angela D. Coleman their Certificate of Achievement.
-Sisterhood Agenda’s constituency grew from 15 global partners to over 1,000 global partners.

2006-2008
-Sisterhood Agenda launched Sisterhood Agenda Magazine with India.Arie on the cover of the first issue.
-Sisterhood Agenda continues sharing its curricula and activity guide publications, doing training, and visiting global partners.
-Sisterhood Agenda increased its online presence with a new website, Facebook and Twitter pages.
-Sisterhood Agenda published Beautiful. with photographer Jamaica Gilmer to increase self-esteem and let Black girls know that they are beautiful.
-Working with interns from Rutgers University and a graphic designer from New York City, Sisterhood Agenda launched 4 more issues of Sisterhood Agenda Magazine.
-www.sisterhoodagenda.com wins Best Site for Sistahs, Black Web Award in 2008.
-The sisterhood continues to expand; there are now over 3,200 Sisterhood Agenda global partners in 30 countries.

spring07

2009
-Sisterhood Agenda relocates its headquarters to St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands, also known as Love City.
-The board of Sisterhood Agenda creates a strategic plan for the next 5 years.

St_John_Map

2010
-Sisterhood Agenda held the first Female Empowerment Conference for Girls in the St. Thomas/St. John school district and received a Certificate of Appreciation from the Virgin Islands Department of Education.
-The first annual Sisterhood Brotherhood New Year’s Eve Youth Extravaganza was held in Cruz Bay, St. John.
-The first Sisterhood Brotherhood Career Development & Life Skills Program was implemented in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands.
-Sisterhood Agenda celebrated its first SHE Sisters Healthy & Empowered event to celebrate National Women’s Health Week (NWHW).
-Sisterhood Agenda launched its first webinar series as part of its Global Training Academy.  Webinar presentations, such as How to Raise Healthy Black Girls, are available for download HERE.

SuperandADC

Virgin Islands Superintendent Dr. Jeanette Smith Barry presents Angela D. Coleman with a Certificate of Appreciation from the Virgin Islands Department of Education

2011
-Sisterhood Agenda published its last issue of Sisterhood Agenda Magazine, transitioning to its sisterhood blog.
-Sisterhood Agenda began its local Sisterhood Mentoring Program for girls in St. John.  A Journey Toward Womanhood was locally adapted for this purpose.
-The Sisterhood Brotherhood Career Development & Life Skills Program continued in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands.
-The 2nd annual Sisterhood Brotherhood New Year’s Eve Youth Extravaganza was held in Cruz Bay, St. John.
-Sisterhood Agenda celebrated National Women’s Health Week (NWHW) with SHE Sisters Healthy & Empowered activities during the week.
-Sisterhood Agenda implements Girl Band in St. John with the St. John School of the Arts

[youtube=http://youtu.be/yP_Lwi6DjpM]

2012
-The www.sisterhoodagenda.com blog was born, taking the organization from static to dynamic online content using the WordPress theme Vigilance.
-Sisterhood Agenda changed its Global Training Academy name to Global Empowerment Academy.
-The Sisterhood Brotherhood Career Development & Life Skills Program continued in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands.
-The 3rd annual Sisterhood Brotherhood New Year’s Eve Youth Extravaganza was held in Cruz Bay, St. John.
-Sisterhood Mentoring Program participants continue to meet.
-Sisterhood Agenda celebrated National Women’s Health Week (NWHW) with SHE Sisters Healthy & Empowered activities during the week.
-Sisterhood Agenda published its first Black Girl Guide book for girls.
-The sisterhood grows with over 3,400 global partners in 32 countries.

BGG MO Bday Cover

2013
-Sisterhood Mentoring Program participants continue to meet.
-The Sisterhood Brotherhood Career Development & Life Skills Program continued in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands.
-The 4th annual Sisterhood Brotherhood New Year’s Eve Youth Extravaganza was held in Cruz Bay, St. John.
-Sisterhood Agenda celebrated National Women’s Health Week (NWHW) with SHE Sisters Healthy & Empowered activities during the week.
-Sisterhood Agenda awarded 3 Global Partner Awards to global partner leaders uplifting and aiding in the self-development of women and girls.
-With funding from the Virgin Islands Department of Health, Sisterhood Agenda launched the State Prevention Framework substance abuse prevention project in St. John.
-Angela D. Coleman founded the St. Youth Coalition to effectively serve the needs of youth on the island.  The first project of the coalition is substance abuse prevention.
-Sisterhood Agenda published three (3) Black Girl Guide books for girls, SHE Sisters Healthy & Empowered Activity Guide, 345 Activities of SisterCamp, and reprinted Beautiful.
-The sisterhood grows to over 3,500 global partners in 34 countries.

SHE Flyer 2013

2014
-Sisterhood Agenda changed its Global Empowerment Academy identification to Sisterhood Empowerment Academy (SEA) and looks for a facility location in St. John.

Sisterhood Empowerment Academy

SEE HOW WE CONTINUE TO PUT SISTERHOOD ON THE AGENDA IN 2014 & BEYOND!

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New UN Gender Database

Woman Rules Ethipian Proverb

The U.N. agency for gender equality and women’s empowerment has launched the first ever global database mapping national constitutions in terms of how they guarantee, deny or protect the rights of women and girls.

The interactive database, accessible on the U.N. Women website at http://constitutions.unwomen.org, covers 195 countries in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and Oceania.  All the constitutions are available in English, as well as in their 62 original languages.

Expected to be updated annually, the database provides a country-by-country overview of the current status of principles and rules relevant to women’s rights and gender equality, as well as a comparison of data across various countries. It is designed to be a tool for gender equality and human rights activists and experts.

The constitutional database was conceived by U.N. Women and supported by the Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA).

Tyra Banks Starts ‘Africa’s Next Top Model’

Africa Next Top Model

Tyra Banks is bringing her reality show to the Motherland with “Africa’s Next Top Model.”  The expansion is the fourth branch of her successful show about modeling. Nigerian model Oluchi Onweagba Orlandi has been selected to serve as the show’s host and co-producer.

“The African version of the franchise is long overdue and I expect the show to be a smashing success across the continent,” Oluchi said in a press release.

Twelve women will be selected from eight countries throughout Africa, and like the American version, the ladies will compete in a number of photo shoots and challenges over the course of 10 episodes to see who makes it to the top.

Entertainment?  Empowerment?  Positive media?  We will wait to see if this show truly celebrates African beauty.

Did You Celebrate Kenya Independence Day on December 12th?

Keep Calm Visit Kenya
LA PLAYLIST DE LA SEMAINE
“Kenya Independance Day”

Le 12 Décembre dernier le Kenya célébrait les 50 ans de son indépendance.
A cette occasion My Afro’Week a préparé une petite playlist de musique
kenyanne presque inconnue en France…

Bonne découverte!

Cliquez sur l’image pour écouter la playlist Une partie de nos playlists sur SOUNDCLOUD
Source: My Afro’ Weekly Newsletter

EMAGAZINE: Rewriting Congo’s Story

E magazine Congo_photo_wide_Endre_Vestvik28472a

The Democratic Republic of the Congo has become known as the “worst place in the world to be a woman.” But for the women of the DRC, this is far from the last word. From a courageous citizen journalist in Goma to a bustling women’s Internet cafe in Bukavu, women across the country are writing an alternative story.

By giving voice to the Congo’s present struggles, these women are changing the future.They are calling for peace, women’s rights, and the protection of the war-ravaged environment. They are bearing witness to the country’s hidden beauty and vast potential for peace and prosperity. As violence has escalated in recent months, their hopeful voices are more urgent than ever. And they need us to listen.

READ MORE…

The African Regional Conference on Population and Development Beyond 2014

African-Regional-Conference-on-Population-and-Development-Beyond-2014_mediumThe African Regional Conference on Population and Development Beyond 2014, attended by 52 countries, was held from September 30 – October 4. 2013 at the United Nations Conference Centre, in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia around the theme “Harnessing the Demographic Dividend: The future we want for Africa.” Organised in partnership with the African Union (AU) and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA), its main aim was to emphasize the need for state and non-state actors to recommit themselves at the highest level to fully implement the ICPD Plan of Action at both national and regional levels.

It was also to review progress, challenges, gaps and emerging issues in relation to the achievement of the goals set out in the ICPD agenda, and makerecommendations to accelerate progress towards the 1994 Programme of Action goals. The conference report will serve as a major reference for population and development policies and programmes beyond 2014 and inform the post-2015 development agenda in Africa. The World YWCA was represented by Hendrica Okondo, World YWCA Global Manager for SRHR, Nelly Lukale, youth coordinator, YWCA of Kenya, Jennifer Mbise, YWCA of Tanzania and Kula Fofana, YWCA of Liberia:

“As a young Woman SRHR champion and activist, sharing this platform with such great African leaders and fellow young people made me want to work harder towards ensuring that I hold my government accountable for promoting and protecting the rights and health of their citizens, especially young women, girls and marginalised groups. Even though there is much progress since the ICPD conference 20 years ago, African women and girls continue to face discrimination and human rights violations in many African countries. There is serious need for comprehensive sexual and reproductive health services to be freely available through the primary health care system. It should be readily and easily accessible to all without discrimination and with respect.”-  Nelly Lukale young woman SRHR champion YWCA Kenya

In his opening remarks during the Ministerial meeting, Hailemariam Desalegn said that “the outcome statement of the African Regional Consultations on the Post-2015 Development Agenda identified the realisation of Africa’s demographic dividend among other outstanding issues, It highlighted the importance of realising Africa’s demographic dividend through such measures as strengthening their entrepreneurial capacity and knowledge base of the youth, increasing their access to finance, and eradicating early marriage and human trafficking”.  READ MORE

Empowering Adolescent Girls and Teenage Mothers in Kenya

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World YWCA Empowering Adolescent Girls

The YWCA of Kenya has been implementing a leadership and empowerment programme for adolescent girls: “Empowering in and out of school girls through sexual reproductive health, leadership and economic empowerment training,”funded by the Population Council and run by Nelly Lukale and Edwina Makokha, two young women from the YWCA of Kenya. In most Kenyan families discussing sex related topics with children is still a taboo. As a result most children, especially girls, discover and learn about sex from their peers. The SRH training aims at empowering girls with relevant information on their sexuality and on life skills so as to reduce their sexual vulnerability. The life skills training includes decision-making, managing emotions, negotiation, and communication skills. The economic empowerment component focuses mostly on helping these girls improve their skills for saving, investing and eventually starting a business. By reducing girls’ dependency and vulnerability to transactional sex and giving them practical skills their transition from adolescence to adulthood will be made easier.  Read more…

Sisterhood Agenda Global Partner Award Winner: Dr. Margaret Kilibwa

Dr. Margaret Kilibwa has expertise in clinical nutrition and health research. She conducts part-time research as assistant professor at Women’s Health Institute of the UMDNJ- Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey. Dr. Kilibwa received Master of Science and Ph.D. in Food Science and Nutrition from Cornell University. She is certified in clinical nutrition from Columbia University. Her research focuses on enhancing healthy longevity and overall health through nutrition tools for women, children and their families.

In addition to her interest in clinical research, Dr. Kilibwa has been involved in international and humanitarian work in Kenya for the past ten years. She was a recipient of a monetary award from Johnson & Johnson and MAP International in 2003 for her devotion to helping children of Nyumbani Orphanage and other parts of Kenya left destitute by the devastation of the HIV virus and alleviating hunger for many people in the rural areas of Western Kenya.

It is her interest in healthy longevity and helping the disadvantaged women, children and their families that led to her founding of TropicalClinics* in 2005. TropicalClinics are innovative health centers with a mission of providing medical and therapeutic care to women, children and their families in rural communities in Kenya through newest generation of drugs, therapeutic nutrients and alternative medicine, and state-of-art diagnostic tools. The first health center is slated to be fully operational in 2012 at Kakamega, a rural region of 173,000 people in Western Kenya.

The comprehensive medical and prevention program she has planned and the skilled palliative care services that she offers to rural women, children and their families in Africa stand among the most personally gratifying achievements of her humanitarian efforts and enhance her belief in purposeful work.

*A Sisterhood Agenda Global Partner

Women4Africa Leader Honoured by Michelle Obama

WomWomen4AFrica Leader with Michelle Obamaen4Africa Recognition Awardee , Dr. Joe Okei Odumakin, was honoured along with 8 other women from around the world with the United State’s Governments prestigious Secretary of State’s International Woman of Courage Award.

The U.S First Lady Michelle Obama joined Secretary of State John Kerry on International Women’s Day March 8th to present Dr. Joe Odumakin with her award.

The Secretary of State’s International Women of Courage Award annually recognizes women around the globe who have shown exceptional courage and leadership in advocating for women’s rights and empowerment, often at great personal risk.

Congratulations to Dr Joe Odumakin!