Sisterhood Agenda

Products That Empower Women And Protect The Earth

Carline

An advocate for women empowerment. Supporting empowerment for women and girls.
Carline

Plastic is polluting the earth’s oceans and landfills at an alarming rate. It is through our own initiatives that we can resolve this global issue.

Plastic and other debris are seen on the shores of Cap Haitian beach, in Cap Haitian, Haiti October 9, 2018. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas

Women all over the world use non-biodegradable and disposable sanitary pads and tampons that end up in landfills and oceans.

One woman uses 11,000 disposable menstrual products during her reproductive age.

Fortunately, there are many earth-friendly alternatives to sanitary pads and tampons.

Period Pants

Period pants are created to promote sustainability and discourage the use of disposable plastic napkins and tampons.

“I have always been passionate about sustainability, and when I graduated from Open University with a degree in Environmental Science, I was determined to get a job in the field,” -Ruby Raut Owner of WUKA

Raut who grew up in Nepal used Sari instead of sanitary napkins.

She said that it was sustainable however it was very uncomfortable.

Raut, with her love for the environment, has a degree in Environmental science.

She joined charities that promote women empowerment and at the same time creating awareness about the environment.

“While I was job-hunting, I joined a few charities, all of whom worked in menstrual education and female empowerment, and volunteered to coordinate an ‘environmenstrual’ project in one of the St Albans schools.

“Speaking to the girls, I realized many weren’t aware of reusable menstrual products.”

Raut grew up in Nepal, using Sari rags during her periods, which were “super sustainable but very uncomfortable – and constantly failed”.

Which then created embarrassment around their periods, some girls choose to stay at home instead of going to school when they have their periods.  Having a “menstrual period” was an embarrassment, knowing that they would have stains after they sat down.

“I sort of had a eureka moment when I was telling the girls at the St. Albans school this story. I thought, why not create pants that absorb flow and are comfortable? And why not create a brand that gives a positive message about periods?”

Her experiences are what drove her to create her own brand WUKA – short for “Wake Up Kick-Ass.” The creation of WUKA has a mission that tackles period stigma and environment issues.

Do they work?

WUKA pants hold twice more than any other period underwear. They absorb up to four tampons of blood. Made of MicroModal fabric, the pants promise to have “tremendous longevity” and retain strength when wet.

Menstrual cups

Menstrual cups are actually an old invention in 1937 by American actress Leona Chalmers.

Made of Latex rubber which relaunched in the 1950s. People thought of it as scandalous so not a lot of people were buying it.

Menstrual cups have gained popularity since 2016.  Tampon and sanitary napkins’ sales have dropped.

Plastic pollution and its impact on the environment have been making the headlines, which increased the interest in using reusable period products.

Made of medical grade silicone, one cup may last up to ten year, making it the most recommended eco-friendly alternative to disposable sanitary pads and tampons.

How do menstrual cups work?

The soft silicone cup is folded and inserted into the vagina. The cup then collects the blood from within. You just have to cleanse and empty them every few hours.

The future

We polluted the oceans and we can solve this problem.

More and more people are converting to sustainable living. Change can be difficult but if you think about making the world a better place to live, a little change is not such a bad idea, after all.

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